John LeBlanc

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ohn LeBlanc is a litigation partner in the firm’s Los Angeles office focusing on matters affecting the health care industry. Mr. LeBlanc represents many of the nation’s leading insurers and health plans, including the largest not-for-profit health care service plan in California.
Mr. LeBlanc has extensive experience, successfully handling hundreds of cases at the state and federal level. He not only serves as counsel to his clients, but acts as a strategic advisor, providing representation on a wide variety of day-to-day legal matters. Mr. LeBlanc is the lead co-author of the health insurance and managed care section of the popular and respected Insurance Litigation Practice Guide, published by The Rutter Group.
Mr. LeBlanc is highly accomplished in visual persuasion, creating powerful graphic presentations for opening statements, closing arguments, mediations, mock trials and speaking engagements. He combines his wide litigation background with a unique ability to create presentations that convey authenticity, credibility and, importantly, result in persuasive and winning arguments. Mr. LeBlanc is available to consult with attorneys and create presentations, regardless of subject matter, and then assist the attorney with delivery and presentation.


Articles By This Author

Supreme Court Rules Affordable Care Act is Constitutional

By John M. LeBlanc and Natalie J. Ferrall

In a 5-4 decision, the United States Supreme Court ruled that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) is constitutional. The majority opinion, authored by Chief Justice Roberts, upheld the centerpiece of the ACA—the individual mandate—requiring citizens to obtain health insurance or pay a penalty to the IRS beginning in 2014. The Court construed the penalty as a tax on persons who choose not to purchase health insurance and thus within Congress’ taxing power. The Chief Justice, however, rejected the argument that the individual mandate was constitutional under the Commerce Clause. He stated that the Commerce Clause “authorizes Congress to regulate interstate commerce, not to order individuals to engage in it.” Justices Scalia, Kennedy, Thomas, and Alito filed a dissenting opinion in which they also found that the individual mandate could not be upheld under the Commerce Clause.

The Court further addressed the so-called Medicaid expansion provision, which required states to extend Medicaid coverage by 2014 to all individuals under the age of 65 with incomes below 133% of the federal poverty line; if a state fails to do so, the federal government could withdraw all of the state’s existing Medicaid funds. The Court held that it was unconstitutional under the Spending Clause for the federal government to coerce states into accepting changes to Medicaid, describing this financial threat as a “gun to the head”, leaving states with no meaningful choice but to accept the terms of the Medicaid expansion. The Court struck the provision, but left the remaining portions of the ACA intact.

Click here to read the full decision (pdf).

Originally posted on Barger & Wolen's Life, Health and Disability Insurance Law blog.

TranscriptPad for iPad Offers Powerful Mobile Transcript Review

TranscriptPad is an elegant, fast and powerful transcript review app for the Apple iPad, designed specifically for the legal field, from the same folks who designed TrialPad, their flagship trial presentation and legal file management app. Similar software exists for your PC or Mac, such as the excellent Deposmart (from Clarity Legal), but TranscriptPad is the first dedicated transcript review and annotation app for the iPad. 

TranscriptPad accepts transcripts in .txt format, and exhibits in .pdf format. (Make sure you request the transcript in .txt format, as some court reporting agencies have their own proprietary format). The .txt format is a simple and relatively small file format that all court reporters can generate, and usually do so at no extra charge. Importing is a breeze, and can be done via email, Dropbox or even iTunes. I’ve uploaded multiple transcripts simultaneously, quickly and without any problems.

TranscriptPad

Transcripts are imported into case folders that you create and that are stored on your iPad. Opening a case folder reveals a deponent folder (created automatically upon import, with the deponent’s name and date of the deposition, along with the volume number). Multiple sessions of the same deponent are placed automatically in the deponent’s folder.

You can read a transcript hands-free by pressing the play button at the bottom of the screen, which allows you to adjust the speed. You can also flip back and forth as if you are reading a book (either in landscape or portrait orientation). 

Most attorneys like to annotate their transcript when reviewing, and here’s where the software really shows off. You can create your own “issue” codes to any part of the transcript. Issue codes can be assigned any name along with a choice of six colors, and appear in the margins of the transcript. You can also flag a portion of the transcript for later review. Issues codes, flags or any portion of the transcript can be emailed or exported to Dropbox. 

TranscriptPad contains a powerful search feature that allows you to search across any transcript or even multiple transcripts. Each hit is highlighted in the text, and you can create issue codes or flags from there, or email the section containing the search result. Detailed or summary reports of your issue codes, flags and searches are easily generated, and can be exported in .pdf or .txt format. 

TranscriptPad’s price tag is $49.99, which is pricey for an app, but on the other hand, this is robust and professional software. Similar software for the Mac or PC start at $200, and go much higher. For lawyers, paralegals, experts, in house counsel, and others who review and annotate transcripts, and who place a premium on mobility, TranscriptPad is a must. TranscriptPad can be found here (www.transcriptpad) and purchased in the Apple App store.

 Originally posted on Barger & Wolen's Life, Health & Disability Insurance Law blog.

Emergency Regulation to Enforce Medical Loss Ratio in Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009 Made Permanent

On Thursday February 9, 2012, California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones announced that he had obtained approval from the California Office of Administrative Law to make permanent the emergency regulation issued in 2011 allowing the Department of Insurance (the “Department”) to enforce the medical loss ratio guidelines in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009 (“PPACA”) (which we previously discussed here). 

As of January 1, 2011, the PPACA required all health insurers in the individual market to maintain an 80% medical loss ratio.

The Department obtained approval to make permanent its amendment to 10 California Code of Regulations § 2222.12 to reflect this requirement. A copy of the text of the regulation can be viewed here

This permanent regulation went into effect on February 8, 2012. 

The regulation adopted by the Department contains more stringent requirements than PPACA, as it allows the Department to evaluate whether the 80% medical loss ratio will be met at the time a rate is filed with the Department, rather than waiting until the end of the year to determine if this ratio was satisfied.

Originally posted to Barger & Wolen's Life, Health and Disability Insurance Law blog.

Technology and the Courtroom

When introducing technology into the courtroom, the trial lawyer needs to be master of that domain. This is not the time to experiment. Trial lawyers not comfortable with technology should seriously consider utilizing litigation-technology support services, who -- for a price -- can provide everything needed to make the presentation look and feel professional, freeing the lawyer up to concentrate on the case.

For those who doubt, Robyn Weisman's recent article in ALM’s Law Technology Review, Wrong Way: Preventing (and Recovering From) Courtroom Snafus, (free subscription) outlines what could happen when technology and people crash during trials, and how to recover from (and prevent) those disasters.

Ms. Weisman’s article provides sound advice for all lawyers utilizing technology in the courtroom. The inability to incorporate technology into your case, or the misuse (or abuse) of PowerPoint, can do more damage than good.

Fredric Lederer, chancellor professor of law and director of the Center for Legal and Court Technology and Legal Skills at William & Mary Law School, says there are three types of trial technology snafus: 1) real or perceived hardware failure, 2) real or perceived software failure, and 3) attorney ineptitude.

Hardware and software failures can be minimized, somewhat, by ensuring that your equipment is up-to-date, with the latest software installed. Back up your software on CD-rom or DVDs. Keep an extra laptop computer handy, preferably one that has a mirror image of your main computer, just in case. Make sure you have the proper cables, extension cords and adapters available. I would never venture into a trial without first paying a visit to the courtroom and getting to know the clerk and scouting out their equipment first, as they often insist that you use their equipment. 

Even for those who master technology, or who use professional services, Ms. Weisman wisely points out some of the pitfalls of using technology that have nothing to do with hardware or software failures. Technology can too easily run roughshod over the rules of evidence. An inadvertent keystroke or move of the mouse can display documents not yet admitted into evidence, or your PowerPoint presentation may obstruct, rather than elucidate your point.

But, for those lawyers who take technology as seriously as their arguments, it can make a world of difference in creating winning presentations. 

Originally posted on Barger & Wolen's Life, Health & Disability Insurance blog.

Rate Regulation Bill Applicable to Health Care Service Plans and Health Insurers Passed by California Assembly

On June 1, 2011, the California State Assembly passed AB 52, which was initially introduced in December 2010.

Beginning January 1, 2012, the bill would require health care service plans and health insurers in California to obtain prior approval from the Department of Managed Health Care or the Department of Insurance for all proposed rate increases.

Under the proposed legislation, the Department of Managed Health Care and the Department of Insurance would be prohibited from approving any rate or rate change that is excessive, inadequate, or unfairly discriminatory. 

In addition, the bill calls for an examination by the Department of Managed Health Care and the Department of Insurance of all rate increases that become effective between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011, to ensure that those rates are not excessive, inadequate, or unfairly discriminatory, and to order the refund of any payments made pursuant to any such rate.

The bill must still be approved by the California Senate and signed into law by the Governor in order to become legally operative.

Originally posted on Barger & Wolen's Life, Health and Disability Insurance Law Blog.

Emergency Regulations to Enforce PPACA Medical Loss Ratio Guidelines Granted to California Department of Insurance

On Monday January 24, 2011, newly elected California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones announced in a press release that he had obtained approval from the California Office of Administrative Law to issue an emergency regulation allowing the Department of Insurance (the “Department”) to enforce the medical loss ratio guidelines in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009 (“PPACA”). 

As of January 1, 2011, the PPACA requires all health insurers in the individual market to maintain an 80% medical loss ratio. The Department obtained approval to amend 10 California Code of Regulations § 2222.12 to mirror this requirement. A copy of the amended text can be viewed here

The emergency regulation went into effect on January 24, 2011, and expires on July 26, 2011. It requires California health insurers to demonstrate compliance with the 80% medical loss ratio at the time of the Department’s rate review.

Originally posted to Barger & Wolen's Life, Health and Disability Insurance Law Blog.

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