Supreme Court Rules Affordable Care Act is Constitutional

By John M. LeBlanc and Natalie J. Ferrall

In a 5-4 decision, the United States Supreme Court ruled that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) is constitutional. The majority opinion, authored by Chief Justice Roberts, upheld the centerpiece of the ACA—the individual mandate—requiring citizens to obtain health insurance or pay a penalty to the IRS beginning in 2014. The Court construed the penalty as a tax on persons who choose not to purchase health insurance and thus within Congress’ taxing power. The Chief Justice, however, rejected the argument that the individual mandate was constitutional under the Commerce Clause. He stated that the Commerce Clause “authorizes Congress to regulate interstate commerce, not to order individuals to engage in it.” Justices Scalia, Kennedy, Thomas, and Alito filed a dissenting opinion in which they also found that the individual mandate could not be upheld under the Commerce Clause.

The Court further addressed the so-called Medicaid expansion provision, which required states to extend Medicaid coverage by 2014 to all individuals under the age of 65 with incomes below 133% of the federal poverty line; if a state fails to do so, the federal government could withdraw all of the state’s existing Medicaid funds. The Court held that it was unconstitutional under the Spending Clause for the federal government to coerce states into accepting changes to Medicaid, describing this financial threat as a “gun to the head”, leaving states with no meaningful choice but to accept the terms of the Medicaid expansion. The Court struck the provision, but left the remaining portions of the ACA intact.

Click here to read the full decision (pdf).

Originally posted on Barger & Wolen's Life, Health and Disability Insurance Law blog.

Emergency Regulation to Enforce Medical Loss Ratio in Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009 Made Permanent

On Thursday February 9, 2012, California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones announced that he had obtained approval from the California Office of Administrative Law to make permanent the emergency regulation issued in 2011 allowing the Department of Insurance (the “Department”) to enforce the medical loss ratio guidelines in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009 (“PPACA”) (which we previously discussed here). 

As of January 1, 2011, the PPACA required all health insurers in the individual market to maintain an 80% medical loss ratio.

The Department obtained approval to make permanent its amendment to 10 California Code of Regulations § 2222.12 to reflect this requirement. A copy of the text of the regulation can be viewed here

This permanent regulation went into effect on February 8, 2012. 

The regulation adopted by the Department contains more stringent requirements than PPACA, as it allows the Department to evaluate whether the 80% medical loss ratio will be met at the time a rate is filed with the Department, rather than waiting until the end of the year to determine if this ratio was satisfied.

Originally posted to Barger & Wolen's Life, Health and Disability Insurance Law blog.

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009 Now in Effect

By Larry M. Golub and Misty A. Murray

On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act of 2009 (“PPACA”) into law. (After the amendments made March 30, 2010, the law is referred to as The Affordable Care Act.) 

While Republicans in Congress vow to repeal such enactment, key aspects of the PPACA went into effect on September 23, 2010, which marks the six-month anniversary of the legislation. 

Although the following list is not exhaustive, here are some of the more notable changes in the health care reform law (effective September 23, 2010) that will apply to individual and group health plans:

Coverage Changes

No Lifetime or Annual Limits on Essential Benefits:

Health plans may not contain lifetime limits on the amount of benefits that will be provided for essential benefits. No regulations have yet been issued regarding the definition of “essential benefits, which in general include, but are not limited to, ambulatory patient services, emergency services, hospitalization, maternity and newborn care, prescription drugs, laboratory services, preventive and wellness services, and chronic disease management.  As for annual limits, for plan years beginning before January 1, 2014, the Department of Health and Human Services’ (“HHS”) interim regulations adopt a three-year phase-in approach of removing annual limits on essential health benefits. For more information, click here.

Anti-Rescission Rules:

Health plans may not rescind, i.e., retroactively cancel coverage, except in cases of fraud or intentional misrepresentations of material fact. These rules do not apply to prospective cancellations or any cancellation due to failure to timely pay premiums.

Mandatory Preventative Health Care Services:

Health plans must provide benefits without cost sharing (i.e., no co-payments, deductibles or co-insurance) for certain preventative services, including, but not limited to, immunizations recommended by the CDC, as well as preventative care and screening for infants, children and adolescents and for women as recommended by the Health Resources and Services Administration. Grandfathered health plans are exempt. (A grandfathered health plan is a group health plan that was created – or an individual health insurance policy that was purchased – on or before March 23, 2010, and a health plan must disclose in its plan materials whether it considers itself to be a grandfathered plan.) 

Extension of Adult Dependents Coverage:

For health plans that elect to provide dependent coverage, such coverage must be extended to adult children up to age 26.

No Pre-existing Condition Exclusions for Children:

Health plans may not impose any preexisting condition exclusions for children 19 and under. (Grandfathered plans are exempt.).

Patient Protection Changes

Right to Choose Primary Care Provider (“PCP”):

For health plans that require designation of a PCP, the patient must be allowed to designate any participating PCP accepting new patients. For children, any participating physician specializing in pediatrics can be designated as the child’s PCP and, for women, any participating OB-GYN can be designated as a PCP.

Coverage for Emergency Services:

For health plans that provide coverage for emergency services, such plans must do so without requiring prior authorization and regardless of whether the provider of emergency services is a participating provider. Emergency services provided by a non-participating provider must also be provided at the same level of cost-sharing as would apply to a participating provider.

Appeals Process:

Group plans must provide for an internal appeals process that complies with the U.S. Department of Labor regulations and individual plans must provide an internal appeals process that comports with the standards established by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Both group and individual plans must also provide for an external appeals process that complies with applicable law or at a minimum with the NAIC Uniform External Review Model Act.

Additional health care reform changes will continue to take effect in 2010 and as late as 2018. More information about the PPACA can be found on the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) website here.

For additional information on ERISA plans and the PPACA, the U.S. Department of Labor has posted information on its website here.

For additional information on the PPACA and individual policies and nonfederal governmental plans, the HHS has posted information on its websites here and here.

Guidelines for Health Insurers Requesting Rate Increase Issued by California Insurance Commissioner (SB 1163)

On February 4, 2011, California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones released draft guidelines for implementing SB 1163 (“Guidance 1163:2”).

SB 1163, signed by former Governor Schwarzenegger on September 30, 2010, responds to the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“PPACA”), which requires the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services to establish a process for the annual review of “unreasonable” increases in premiums for health insurance coverage.

Under the federal act, health insurers must submit to the secretary, and the relevant state, a justification for an “unreasonable” premium increase prior to implementation of the increase.

SB 1163, effective January 1, 2011, requires health insurers to file with the California Department of Managed Health Care or the California Department of Insurance detailed rate information regarding proposed premium increases and requires that the rate information be certified by an independent actuary. 

The bill authorizes the departments to review these filings and issue guidance regarding compliance. It also requires the departments to consult with each other regarding specified actions as well as post certain findings on their Internet Web sites.

In his draft guidelines (“Guidance 1163:2”), Commissioner Jones lists several factors that will be used by the Department to determine if a rate is “unreasonable.”

Under Section A: Unreasonable Rate Increases, the first factor the Department will look at is:

[t]he relationship of the projected aggregate medical loss ratio to the federal medical loss ratio standard in the market segment to which the rate applies, after accounting for any adjustments allowable under federal law.” (Guidance 1163:2, § A, p. 1.) 

The draft guidelines expressly incorporate, by reference, the interim federal regulation effective January 1, 2011, titled “Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio Requirements Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act,” 45 C.F.R. §§ 158.101-158.232.

The interim federal regulation requires health insurers to spend a certain percentage of consumers’ premiums on direct care for patients and efforts to improve health care quality.

For individual and small group market insurers, this is 80% of the consumers’ premium, and for large group market insurers, it is 85% of the consumers’ premium.

If insurers fail to meet the ratio requirements, beginning in 2012, they will be required to provide a rebate to their customers by August 1 of each year.

The federal rule allows for a State to require a higher medical loss ratio than that required under the interim regulation. The interim federal regulation (pdf), published December 1, 2010, is subject to a 60-day public comment period.

Other factors identified in Commissioner Jones’ draft guidelines to determine whether a premium increase is “unreasonable” include: 

  • Whether the assumptions for the rate increase are supported by substantial evidence;
  • Whether the choice of assumptions or combination of assumptions for the rate increase is reasonable;
  • Whether the data or documentation provided is incomplete or inadequate;
  • Whether the filed rates result in premium differences between insureds within similar risk categories that either are not permissible under California law or do not reasonably correspond to differences in expected costs;
  • Whether itemized changes are substantially justified by credible experience data;
  • Rate of return for prior three years and anticipated for the following year;
  • Insurer’s employee and executive compensation;
  • Degree to which the increase exceeds rate of medical cost inflation;
  • For individual policies, compliance with 10 C.C.R. 2222.12. (Guidance 1163:2, § A, pp. 1-2.) 

In addition to Filing and Notice requirements as well as specific filing forms (Sections B and D Guidance 1163:2), the draft guidelines contain several requirements for actuarial certification. Each of the following must be included in the actuarial certification:

  • The actuary’s qualifications and independence;
  • Opinion that the proposed premium rates are “actuarially sound in the aggregate;”
  • Complete description of data, assumptions, rating factors and methods with rate calculations for each contract or policy form;
  • Statement of opinion whether the rate increase is reasonable or unreasonable, and if, the latter, the justification for the increase; a discussion of the factors listed in § A, and 10 C.C.R. § 2222.10 for individual health insurance;
  • A description of the testing performed by the actuary. (Guidance 1163:2, § C, pp. 3-4.) 

Notwithstanding the above requirements, the Insurance Commissioner currently does not have the authority under SB 1163 to reject health insurance rate increases.

In the last legislative term, Commissioner Jones (formerly an assemblyman) sponsored AB 2578, a strong insurance rate reform bill that would have given the Commissioner such authority (it failed to pass in the Senate).

The Commissioner is currently supporting another effort at such legislation.

Commissioner Jones’ draft guidelines are subject to a 7 day public comment period before they are finalized.

Emergency Regulations to Enforce PPACA Medical Loss Ratio Guidelines Granted to California Department of Insurance

On Monday January 24, 2011, newly elected California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones announced in a press release that he had obtained approval from the California Office of Administrative Law to issue an emergency regulation allowing the Department of Insurance (the “Department”) to enforce the medical loss ratio guidelines in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009 (“PPACA”). 

As of January 1, 2011, the PPACA requires all health insurers in the individual market to maintain an 80% medical loss ratio. The Department obtained approval to amend 10 California Code of Regulations § 2222.12 to mirror this requirement. A copy of the amended text can be viewed here

The emergency regulation went into effect on January 24, 2011, and expires on July 26, 2011. It requires California health insurers to demonstrate compliance with the 80% medical loss ratio at the time of the Department’s rate review.

Originally posted to Barger & Wolen's Life, Health and Disability Insurance Law Blog.

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009 Now in Effect

By Larry M. Golub and Misty A. Murray

On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act of 2009 (“PPACA”) into law. (After the amendments made March 30, 2010, the law is referred to as The Affordable Care Act.) 

While Republicans in Congress vow to repeal such enactment, key aspects of the PPACA went into effect on September 23, 2010, which marks the six-month anniversary of the legislation. 

Although the following list is not exhaustive, here are some of the more notable changes in the health care reform law (effective September 23, 2010) that will apply to individual and group health plans:

Coverage Changes

No Lifetime or Annual Limits on Essential Benefits:

Health plans may not contain lifetime limits on the amount of benefits that will be provided for essential benefits. No regulations have yet been issued regarding the definition of “essential benefits, which in general include, but are not limited to, ambulatory patient services, emergency services, hospitalization, maternity and newborn care, prescription drugs, laboratory services, preventive and wellness services, and chronic disease management.  As for annual limits, for plan years beginning before January 1, 2014, the Department of Health and Human Services’ (“HHS”) interim regulations adopt a three-year phase-in approach of removing annual limits on essential health benefits. For more information, click here.

Anti-Rescission Rules:

Health plans may not rescind, i.e., retroactively cancel coverage, except in cases of fraud or intentional misrepresentations of material fact. These rules do not apply to prospective cancellations or any cancellation due to failure to timely pay premiums.

Mandatory Preventative Health Care Services:

Health plans must provide benefits without cost sharing (i.e., no co-payments, deductibles or co-insurance) for certain preventative services, including, but not limited to, immunizations recommended by the CDC, as well as preventative care and screening for infants, children and adolescents and for women as recommended by the Health Resources and Services Administration. Grandfathered health plans are exempt. (A grandfathered health plan is a group health plan that was created – or an individual health insurance policy that was purchased – on or before March 23, 2010, and a health plan must disclose in its plan materials whether it considers itself to be a grandfathered plan.) 

Extension of Adult Dependents Coverage:

For health plans that elect to provide dependent coverage, such coverage must be extended to adult children up to age 26.

No Pre-existing Condition Exclusions for Children:

Health plans may not impose any preexisting condition exclusions for children 19 and under. (Grandfathered plans are exempt.).

Patient Protection Changes

Right to Choose Primary Care Provider (“PCP”):

For health plans that require designation of a PCP, the patient must be allowed to designate any participating PCP accepting new patients. For children, any participating physician specializing in pediatrics can be designated as the child’s PCP and, for women, any participating OB-GYN can be designated as a PCP.

Coverage for Emergency Services:

For health plans that provide coverage for emergency services, such plans must do so without requiring prior authorization and regardless of whether the provider of emergency services is a participating provider. Emergency services provided by a non-participating provider must also be provided at the same level of cost-sharing as would apply to a participating provider.

Appeals Process:

Group plans must provide for an internal appeals process that complies with the U.S. Department of Labor regulations and individual plans must provide an internal appeals process that comports with the standards established by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Both group and individual plans must also provide for an external appeals process that complies with applicable law or at a minimum with the NAIC Uniform External Review Model Act.

Additional health care reform changes will continue to take effect in 2010 and as late as 2018. More information about the PPACA can be found on the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) website here.

For additional information on ERISA plans and the PPACA, the U.S. Department of Labor has posted information on its website here.

For additional information on the PPACA and individual policies and nonfederal governmental plans, the HHS has posted information on its websites here and here.