What Is Divorce Insurance?

Divorce insurance is something that many married couples “Google search” for when tying the knot — and no wonder, because 9 out of 10 people will marry by the time they reach age 50 and up to half of those couples will inevitably divorce. But unfortunately divorce insurance doesn’t actually exist. There was a sort of divorce insurance “test” back in 2010, but big shock: it didn’t work out for the insurer. The theory was simple enough. Married couples can experience financial upset during divorce, so why not offer them a backup plan?

Probably the biggest problem with the actual “divorce insurance” concept is that there are already fail-safe measures that can be preemptively taken by couples if they want to protect their financial interests against divorce. But even those measures are scrutinized and stigmatized because marriage is supposed to be a lifetime vow — a commitment. Take the prenup, for example: the legal contract can stipulate what would happen should divorce take place, and is signed before the marriage licenses are obtained.

The difference between a prenup and the doomed divorce insurance was simple enough, though. A prenup is an agreement between two committed partners, while divorce insurance was an agreement between a business and just one of those assumedly committed partners.

But the problems with divorce insurance are equally obvious. Do you think an insurance company willingly pays out a settlement unless forced? Not a chance. When you’re in a car accident between two or more parties, the insurance company literally sends out highly qualified and well paid individuals to make sure the story you provide is the right one. If you were the cause of the accident, don’t expect to get anything that isn’t owed.

But how do you make an agreement that basically says “if you divorce this person, you’ll receive this benefit”? The coverage basically becomes about what would happen under set conditions, just like any other insurance. Your spouse cheated on you and you want a divorce? Great. Your divorce insurance benefit should pay up. But first you need to provide beyond any shadow of a doubt that your spouse actually cheated. Any footage of that event? Hint: you’re probably breaking a half-dozen laws by having footage of that event, much less sharing it.

So you can see why the coverage options were likely doomed from the beginning.

But there’s probably no replacement for a traditional divorce attorney. Looking for one? You can visit website of any local attorney you choose, and most will always offer a free consultation to see if you’re a good match.

An attorney can also help relevant parties come to a marriage settlement, which is typically an agreement made to iron out details of who pays what (think alimony or child support) after marriage. The might also include more immediate concerns like assets, child custody, child visitation rights, etc. It’s always a good idea to know what you want out of a marriage — and what you want out of a divorce.

Check out some of the coverage when divorce insurance was first offered: